MON, AUGUST 08, 2022
2 satellites carried by Nuri communicate with ground stations
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2 satellites carried by Nuri communicate with ground stations
  • By Korea.net
  • 승인 2022.07.06 23:25
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Separated from the performance verification satellite carried into space on the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-Ⅱ), aka Nuri, cube (small) satellites developed by research teams of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and Seoul National University have conducted two-way communication with their respective ground stations. Shown here on June 6 are researchers moving to load the verification satellite on Nuri at the Payload Processing Building of Naro Space Center. (Korea Aerospace Research Institute)
Separated from the performance verification satellite carried into space on the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-Ⅱ), aka Nuri, cube (small) satellites developed by research teams of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and Seoul National University have conducted two-way communication with their respective ground stations. Shown here on June 6 are researchers moving to load the verification satellite on Nuri at the Payload Processing Building of Naro Space Center. (Korea Aerospace Research Institute)

Separated from the performance verification satellite that was carried into space by the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-Ⅱ), aka Nuri, cube (small) satellites were developed by research teams at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and Seoul National University (SNU) have conducted two-way communication with their respective ground stations.

This indicates that the satellites are properly functioning, given their ability to exchange orders.

The Ministry of Science and ICT on July 4 said SNU's satellite Snuglite-II at 3:21 p.m. conducted two-way communication. 

At 3:21 a.m., the SNU team transmitted a signal to its satellite to unfold the antenna.

Snuglite-II complied and sent back a signal indicating its status, succeeding in two-way communication. 

This satellite conducts precision studies of Earth's atmosphere using carrier signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS).

Earlier on July 3 at 4:10 p.m., the KAIST-developed cube satellite Randev also had two-way communication with its ground station.

On the same day around 2 a.m. and 2:40 p.m., KAIST's ground station ordered its satellite to change the state of its power supply channel and change the system mode from standby to antenna deployment.

At 4:10 p.m., the station confirmed that the satellite analyzed the signal and completed its given mission.

A small satellite measuring 10 cm wide, 10 cm long and 30 cm tall and weighing 3.2 kg, Randev is designed to conduct terrestrial imaging with a small observation camera and transmit the images to the ground station.


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